Campus Sustainability

About

The Team

The Green Initiative Fund "Team" is the day-to-day staff that runs the whole TGIF program including the Zero Waste Research Center and Nature village. The team is made up of the TGIF Coordinator (staff person),TGIF Program Associates (student staff), Zero Waste Research Center Associates (student staff), and Nature Village Program Associates (student staff). TGIF also has a Committee and Project Leaders (those who implement TGIF funded projects).

 

TGIF Program Associates 
The TGIF Program Associates internship program first began in February 2013. The TGIF Program Associates assist the TGIF Coordinator with the documentation of TGIF funded projects. Duties include recording and calculating both quantitative and qualitative sustainability metrics produced by these projects, and involve reading project updates, reports, and interviewing project leaders. The TGIF Program Associates also assist the TGIF Coordinator with displaying and publicizing these metrics through new and innovative ways, including blog posts, articles, videos, and social media. Meet the TGIF Program Associates below!
 

Jimmy Dunn is a fourth year at UC Berkeley studying Environmental Sciences. He is fascinated with the interconnected living and non-living systems that make up planet Earth and is equally interested in how human beings define and interact with their environment. He joined the TGIF team in 2014 and is honored to have worked with such driven project leaders on expanding sustainability at the UC Berkeley campus. Jimmy enjoys singing along to Lianne La Havas', "Unstoppable" to help him time his showers.

Claremont Canyon Hike

 

Lauren Murphy is a fourth year double majoring in Rhetoric and Society and Environment (S&E) with an emphasis in global environmental politics. Wanting to become more involved with the environmental community at Cal, Lauren joined the TGIF team in January 2015 and has especially enjoyed working with project leaders and the TGIF Committee. Lauren has lived in the Bay Area her whole life and is most often found running outdoors or exploring open space trails. Clean energy and resource conservation are two of her particular interests, and after graduation Lauren plans to attend law school and pursue a career in environmental law. 

 

Brian Gialketsis, from Ventura County, California, is entering his third year here at Cal, and he's very excited to be a member of The Green Initiative Fund Team. He's pursuing a simultaneous degree in Rhetoric and Conservation & Resource Studies, with an interest in Political Ecology. When he's not at the beach or on a hiking trail, you can find Brian making playlists of new music; attending festivals, concerts, lectures and performances; reading about current events; spending time with family and friends or working to inspire environmental sustainability and justice.

 

Nature Village Program Associates 
Nature Village Sustainable Living is a multidisciplinary program led by University Village Residents, UC Berkeley students, staff, campus sustainability groups, and volunteers who work together to promote and engage residents in sustainable living practices at the University Village. Nature Village Program Associates work collaboratively with the Native Village Coordinator, University Village Director, other Nature Village Program Associate, and campus groups to complete projects and reduce the environmental impact of University Village.

Caitriona Smyth is a fourth year Economics major double-minoring in Forestry and Conservation and Resource Studies. In the past she worked on campus as a Program Associate for The Green Initiative Fund, and interned with the Berkeley Student Food Collective on a TGIF-funded project. In her free time she likes to cook or wander the outdoors, usually by backpacking or swimming. She loves good books, sustainable solutions and silly people.

 

Zero Waste Research Center Program Associates

The Zero Waste Research Center(ZWRC) at UC Berkeley researches and implements upstream strategies for reducing campus waste, with a focus on purchasing, redesigning products, creating behavior change incentives, and instituting closed-loop “circular economy” waste systems. ZWRC Program Associates manage, implement, and reserach best practices and policies for zero waste. 

Tara Singh is a third year pursuing a major in Urban Studies and a minor in Geospatial Information Science Technology. She is especially interested in sustainable environmental design and how it can create cities that are more efficient as a whole. Tara is thrilled to be a part of the Zero Waste team and is excited to execute her skills in GIS to do further analysis of the existing waste management systems that are in place. Tara grew up in Chicago, IL and moved to San Francisco, CA for high school. Her transition to a more environmentally-conscious area is marked by her passion to study and eventually implement sustainable interventions in cities. Tara is also an active member of the Bay-area Environmentally Aware Consulting Network (BEACN) where she contributed towards creating a five year marketing plan to reach Cal’s Zero Waste goal by 2020. In her spare time, Tara loves exploring the various neighborhoods of the Bay Area, photographing various landscapes, and playing tennis. 

 
Anna Yip is a second year at Cal intending to double major in Environmental Science and Environmental Economics and Policy with a strong interest in food sustainability and waste elimination. She has been active in the environmental community since converting to a vegetarian lifestyle for sustainability purposes at nine years old, and has since been devoting herself to bettering the earth in any way possible. Also a member of the Residential Sustainability Program (RSP) and Building Sustainability at Cal (BS@C), Anna is ecstatic to begin her journey with TGIF in pursuit of Cal's Zero Waste by 2020 goal. Besides for her commitment to being an environmental crusader, Anna is also an avid runner, reader, baker, biker, world traveler, and backpacker. She becomes most motivated when frozen yogurt is used as an incentive. annayip
Scott Silva is a first year student studying Environmental Science. He has worked with organizations in his hometown of Napa dealing with natural park management, resource conservation, and youth environmental education and stewardship. Scott is also the treasurer of the Cal Hiking and Outdoor Society, where one of his greatest passions is leading hikes around the Bay Area. In addition to hiking, Scott enjoys mountain biking, playing music of all sorts, and travelling to various natural wonders. Scott’s goals in working toward environmental justice relate to his interest in waste management, water allocation, and conservation policy.

 

The TGIF & Sustainability Initiatives Coordinator
The TGIF Coordinator manages The Green Initiative Fund, UC Berkeley's student-fee based campus sustainability fund. The TGIF Coordinator is responsible for coordinating and promoting the fall and spring TGIF Grant application processes, advising and supporting the TGIF Committee during grant selection, documenting the TGIF program, tracking the progress of TGIF funded projects, advising the TGIF project leaders, and providing consultation on green fund best practices to other colleges and universities. Detailed description here.
 

Sharon Daraphonhdeth was born and raised in San Diego county, where she began her educational endeavors at Palomar College. She currently oversees The Green Initiative Fund, the Zero Waste Research Center and Nature Village. Her passions lies among working with students, by assisting them to develop, implement and lead innovative sustainability projects and initiatives. At her leisure, she enjoys live music, cooking and spending time with her loved ones (especially her cat, Lucille). She also serves as a board member for a vegan food justice non-profit in her spare time. She holds a B.A. in Environmental Studies from San Francisco State University

sharonheadshot1

 

2010-2014 TGIF Coordinator

Katherine H. Walsh is a “wicked proud” Bostonian with a B.A. in Political Science and Environmental Studies from Boston College, and a Certificate in Leadership in Sustainability and Environmental Management from UC Berkeley-Extension. Katherine is the Director of the Student Environmental Resource Center (SERC) at UC Berkeley, after serving as Coordinator of The Green Initiative Fund from 2010-2014 and SERC Advisor since 2012.

Katherine sits on the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability, the Zero Waste Working Group, the Berkeley Climate Action Coalition Steering Committee, and is an affiliated staff member with the Berkeley Food Institute. She also leads the annual Beverage Alliance Sustainability Grant project and is a member of the UC Carbon Neutrality Initiative Student Engagement Group. Katherine is a recipient of the 2008 Boston College Person of the Year Award and a 2013 UC Berkeley Chancellor's Outstanding Staff Award.


 

 

2008-2010 TGIF Coordinator- Nicole Leung

Past Program Associates: 

2015-2016: Jimmy Dunn; Lauren Murphy; Brian Gialketsis

2014-2015: Caitriona Smyth; Jimmy Dunn; Lauren Murphy 

2013-2014: Claire Kaufman, Kareem Hammoud

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. When and how was The Green Initiative Fund established?
  2. Does TGIF have Bylaws?
  3. How much is the student fee that pays into The Green Initiative Fund?
  4. Is the fee mandatory, opt-in, or opt-out?
  5. Is TGIF a revolving loan fund?
  6. Will UC Berkeley always have the TGIF program?
  7. Who selects the grant awards?
  8. Who sits on the TGIF Committee?
  9. What are TGIF's reporting lines?
  10. Does TGIF have any paid staff?
  11. Who can apply for a grant from TGIF?
  12. When can someone apply for a grant from TGIF?
  13. How much funding does TGIF award each year?
  14. What types of grant projects are funded by TGIF?
  15. What are the requirements of a TGIF grant project?
  16. How many projects have been funded by TGIF?
  17. How many funded projects have been completed?
  18. How many funded projects are currently in-progress?
  19. Are TGIF grant projects required to report on their progress?
  20. Does TGIF fund student internships?
  21. How can I get involved with TGIF?
  22. Are there green funds at other colleges and universities?
  23. How do I start a campus green fund at my own college or university?


1. When and how was The Green Initiative Fund (TGIF) established?
TGIF was established in spring/summer 2007 thanks to a campus-wide campaign from a group of UC Berkeley students who heard about the TGIF program at UC Santa Barbara. The TGIF Campaign team successfully put a referendum on the spring 2007 ASUC (student government) elections, and TGIF passed with 69% of votes in favor of the program. The UC Berkeley Chancellor and UC Regents approved TGIF in the summer of 2007 and TGIF began collecting student fees fall 2007.

2. Does TGIF have Bylaws?
Yes- you can view them here.

3. How much is the student fee that pays into The Green Initiative Fund?

Years Year Numbers Fee per Student per Semester
2007-08, 2008-09, and 2009-10 Years 1-3 $5.00
2010-11, 2011-12, and 2012-13 Years 4-6 $5.50
2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 Years 7-10 $6.00


4. Is the fee mandatory, opt-in, or opt-out?
The fee is mandatory. Per UC Office of the President policy on student fees, a 1/3 of each student's TGIF fee is automatically given to student financial aid, so TGIF actually receives 2/3 of the fee.

5. Is TGIF a revolving loan fund?
No, TGIF is a campus green fund. TGIF does offer a loan option and the TGIF Committee determines whether or not a project receives a grant or a loan; TGIF does not usually require projects to pay back the grant. TGIF awarded its first "loan" during the 2013 Fall Mini-Grant cycle to the Berkeley Student Food Collective for purchase of a new produce fridge. The BSFC will pay back the full $2,000 interest free within 10 months.

6. Will UC Berkeley always have the TGIF program?
In 2016-2017, the UC Berkeley student body will need to vote on whether or not to keep the TGIF program.

7. Who selects the grant awards?
The TGIF Committee. The TGIF Committee is the decision-making body for The Green Initiative Fund. The committee chooses which projects receive money, approves changes to awards, and guides the general direction of TGIF.

8. Who sits on the TGIF Committee?
The TGIF Committee has seven voting members and five non-voting members. Students have the majority vote.
Voting Members:

  • One graduate Student appointed by the Chair of the Environmental Sustainability Committee of the Graduate Assembly (GA)
  • One undergraduate Student appointed by the Associated Students of the University of California (ASUC) Environmental Sustainability Director
  • One Student appointed by the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability (CACS)
  • One undergraduate Student, selected by the Grant-Making Committee after the other three student members have been selected
  • One Faculty member selected by the Academic Senate
  • One Staff member from Administration, selected by the Vice Chancellor for Administration
  • One Staff member from Facilities Services, selected by the Vice Chancellor of Facilities Services


Non-Voting Members
The campus Sustainability Director, a member of the Committee on Student Fees, a representative of the ASUC Senate, an ex-officio from Capital Projects, and the TGIF Coordinator shall attend Committee meetings as non-voting Members.

9. What are TGIF's reporting lines?
As of fall 2013, TGIF is a program offered by the new Student Environmental Resource Center (SERC). SERC is a functional area within the LEAD Center, a unit within the ASUC Student Union, which is a campus department within the Division of Student Affairs at UC Berkeley.  TGIF must write and make public an annual report on its programmatic and financial activities. TGIF must also submit an annual student fee report to the Committee on Student Fees.

10. Does TGIF have any paid staff?
Yes. The TGIF Program has one staff Coordinator position (the TGIF Coordinator) that is .8FTE TGIF and .2FTE SERC. The TGIF Coordinator reports to the SERC Director and to the TGIF Committee. The TGIF Committee can recommend to the Executive Director of the ASUC Auxiliary that the TGIF Coordinator be removed from his/her position, but does not have the power to make the removal. 
TGIF also has 3 TGIF Program Associates who are student staff. You can learn more about the Coordinator and Associates positions on the TGIF Team page.

11. Who can apply for a grant from TGIF?
All UC Berkeley students, staff, and faculty can apply for TGIF grants.

12. When can someone apply for a grant from TGIF?
Prospective applicants can apply for TGIF grants during the fall and spring semesters. TGIF offers a fall mini-grant program and a spring grant program. The mini-grant cycle (application) is a one-stage process and the spring grant cycle is a two-stage process (abstract and application).

13. How much funding does TGIF award each year?
TGIF is able to award between $250,000-$300,000 per year as of 2012-2013; TGIF awards funding based on the quality of a project and does not have a "use it or lose it" clause. Unawarded funding automatically rolls over into the following year's budget. You can view more details about the annual TGIF budget on our Annual Budget and Reports page.

Year Number of Projects Total Amount Awarded
2008 9 $168,615
2009 10 $286,650
2010 14 $249,150
2011 15 $247,675
2012 22 $308,630
2012 Mini-Grants 12 $17,525
2013 14 $278,505.41
Additional Grant Funds Awarded (existing projects) $30,085
2013 Mini-Grants 14 $20,912.90
2013 Mini-Loan 1 $2,000
2014 12 $225,065
2014 Mini-Grants 8 $12,717
2015 Spring Grants 15 $200,230
2015 Mini-Grants 3 $4,731.50
TOTAL 149 $2,052,491.81


14. What types of grant projects are funded by TGIF?
TGIF categorizes its grant projects in the following sustainability themes (but accepts sustainability projects outside these specific themes): Education & Behavior Change, Energy Conservation & Efficiency, Food Justice & Sustainability, Habitat Restoration, Transporation, Water Conservation & Efficiency, Waste Reduction.

15. What are the requirements of a TGIF grant project?
The requirements of a TGIF grant project can be found on our Develop Your Grant page.

16. How many projects have been funded by TGIF?
One hundred and forty-nin (149) projects. 

17. How many funded projects have been completed?
53 TGIF funded projects have completed since 2008. 3 projects have been discontinued.

  • 2012 Mini-Grant Awards- four projects
  • 2012 Grant Awards- ten projects
  • 2011 Grant Awards- eleven projects
  • 2010 Grant Awards- thirteen projects
  • 2009 Grant Awards- seven projects
  • 2008 Grant Awards- eight total projects; five Earth Weeks


18. How many funded projects are currently in-progress?
55 TGIF Funded Projects are currently in progress.

  • 2013 Mini-Grant Awards- fifteen projects
  • 2013 Grant Awards- fourteen projects
  • 2012 Mini-Grant Awards- eight projects
  • 2012 Grant Awards – twelve projects
  • 2011 Grant Awards – four projects
  • 2010 Grant Awards – one project
  • 2009 Grant Awards – one project
  • 2008 Grant Awards – all completed


19. Are TGIF grant projects required to report on their progress?
Yes. Project leaders of all TGIF grant awards are required to attend a workshop prior to gaining access to their funds. During this workshop, the TGIF Coordinator reviews all TGIF project expectations, reporting requirements, and project timelines. You can view our reporting expectations and requirements here. The results of the projects' efforts can be found on the Overview & Metrics page as well as on the projects' individual pages.

20. Does TGIF fund student internships?
Yes. TGIF has funded 195 paid student internships related to our projects. Looking for an internship? Visit our Jobs page.

21. How can I get involved with TGIF?
Visit our How to Get Involved page for details.

22. Are there green funds at other colleges and universities?
Yes. Visit our Green Fund Resources page for details.

23. How do I start a campus green fund at my own college or university?
Visit our How to Start a Green Fund page, Green Fund Resources page, and TGIF Campaign History page for helpful resources on how to start your campus green fund. 

How to Get Involved

There are multiple ways to get involved with The Green Initiative Fund:

1. Serve on the TGIF Committee and be part of the team that selects the projects that TGIF funds each year and guides the general direction of the TGIF program. The TGIF Committee has four student seats, two staff seats, and one faculty seat.

2. Develop a campus sustainability project and apply for a grant from TGIF.

3. Join an existing project that has already been funded by TGIF. Check out the "Funded Projects" tab to read about the various projects that have been funded by TGIF since 2008, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and ask to be connected with a project that has interested you. Not sure which project to join? Inquire about volunteer needs with the different TGIF projects- many projects can always use more support.

4. Apply for a student internship funded by TGIF. Most of TGIF's funded projects include a budget to hire student interns- visit our Jobs page or join the TGIF listserv by sending an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

5. Volunteer with the TGIF Coordinator. Duties include, but not limited to, outreach and publicity, video production, and sustainability metrics analysis and reporting. Potential for a paid internship position. Email Katherine Walsh at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for details.

6. Start your own green fund. Are you from another campus and would like to have a campus sustainability fund at your school? Be sure to check out our different resources for assisting you with the process: Campaign History, Referendum, Bylaws, Green Fund Resources, Start Your Own Green Fund.

7. Sign up for the weekly TGIF email for the latest sustainability news, events, opportunities, and jobs.


Winning at CHESC
PowerSave Green Campus and Greening the Greeks at the 2012 California Higher Education Sustainability Conference, accepting their award for "Best Student Energy Efficiency Program" for their TGIF-sponsored Green Cup Competition.

Program History

2006-2007: The Campaign Year

2007-2008: The First Year- The First TGIF Grants


 2008-2009: The Second Year- TGIF Hires its First Coordinator

2009-2010: The Third Year- Introducing the Abstract Process

2010-2011: The Fourth Year- TGIF Hires its Second Coordinator

2011-2012: The Fifth Year- Reaching Milestones

2012-2013: The Sixth Year- Introducing Mini-Grants

 

2006-2007: The Campaign Year
The Green Initiative Fund was created via a student fee referendum on the ballot during UC Berkeley's 2007 ASUC elections. By voting yes on the referendum, UC Berkeley's students created TGIF's $5 per semester student fee and created the charter by which TGIF operates.

The TGIF campaign was created and run by a group of undergraduate and graduate students at Berkeley. Much of the inspiration and ideas for the Fund's structure was taken from The Green Initiative Fund at UC Santa Barbara, which had been created by a student referendum the previous year. TGIF's core campaign team consisted of about 15 students, who worked tirelessly in fall 2006 and spring 2007 to finalize TGIF's design and determine the best way to pitch the TGIF Dream to Berkeley's student body. During the two "campaign" weeks immediately before the ASUC elections, the campaign team organized its 30+ additional volunteers for tabling activities on Sproul Plaza, spoke to student groups on campus, publicized itself via email, and debated critics. The TGIF campaign's $3,000 budget was funded via a generous grant from Tom Kalil, Special Advisor to the Chancellor for Science and Technology, as well as individual contributions from passionate students.

The campaign team's hard work paid off - UC Berkeley's TGIF referendum succeeded, winning 69% of the student vote.

2007-2008: The First Year- The First TGIF Grants
The 2007-08 academic year was the first year of operation for TGIF. The first TGIF Committee was appointed and met throughout the year to execute all aspects of TGIF. Much of the success of the Committee was visible in the establishment of the infrastructure and processes of TGIF, which included the TGIF Bylaws. The ASUC Auxiliary agreed to house TGIF within its department, providing a home base for the financial administration and organizational knowledge of TGIF.

The TGIF Committee also organized a large publicity campaign to increase campus awareness of TGIF's existance and to solicit grant applications from students, staff, and faculty. Information was spread through class announcements, email lists, the launch of the first website, and three informational sessions with attendance totaling thirty people. The response to these efforts was great, with 28 grant applications submitted, requesting a total of $1.2 million; in comparison, UCSB's TGIF received 18 applications totaling $490,000 in its first year of operation. The TGIF Committee selected nine projects and awarded a total of $168,615.

The TGIF Committee received an award from the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability recognizing its incredible efforts to promote sustainability within the UC Berkeley community.


2008-2009: The Second Year- TGIF Hires its First Coordinator
The 2008-2009 Committee continued to build upon the work of the previous committee. Nicole Leung was hired as the first TGIF Coordinator and began work during the fall semester to raise awareness about TGIF and support the efforts of the committee and the 2008 grantees. Of the 2008 grant awaredees, five projects were completed by June 30th, 2009 and four were still in progress. These projects generated increased education of campus sustainability as well as reduced the amount of resources consumed by the university. For instance, the I Heart Tapwater Campaign combined outreach activities such as tabling with water bottle give-aways with efforts to promote infrastructure projects like installations of bottle refill stations in campus buildings.

During the spring semester, TGIF was heavily promoted to solicit more grant applications and publicize the efforts of the grantees. TGIF was communicated largely through online methods (emails, the TGIF and other campus websites, online newsletters) although a series of class announcements and three informational sessions was also undertaken to communicate about the applications. Nicole and members of the committee also tabled at many campus-wide events such as the PlayGREEN Festival, Cal Day, and at Earthweek activities. Finally, in a tradition that has since continued, four of the 2008 grantees and TGIF created posters that were displayed at the CACS Summit, the Office of the President Earth Day event, and the California Higher Education Sustainability Conference.

For the 2008-2009 grant cycle, a total of 33 applications were submitted with a total request of almost $1.3 million. The number of applications was up from 2007-2008 as well as the entire amount request (the 2007-08 total was about $1.2 million). TGIF also received significantly more small requests (those less than $10,000). The TGIF Committee selected ten projects and awarded a total of $286,650.


2009-2010: The Third Year- Introducing the Abstract Process
For the 2009-2010 grants cycle, TGIF switched to using an abstract system whereby projects submitted a two-page abstract and received approval by the TGIF committee before submitting a full application. The abstract system allows the committee to interact earlier in the application process with the projects and provide feedback prior to the projects' final submissions.

With the new system in place, the committee reviewed 39 abstracts, 37 original and 2 re-submitted abstracts. As a result of the abstract review, 21 full applications were submitted and reviewed for funding. A total of 14 projects were selected and awarded a monetary total of $249,150. A continuing trend noticed with the 2010 grants cycle was that a greater percentage of projects were awarded smaller grants (less than $10,000), as fewer projects requested large grants.

The 2009-2010 TGIF grants cycle experienced a number of campus publicity highlights. TGIF continued to be communicated through online methods such as emails, the TGIF website, Facebook, and online newsletters. The student group Innovative Design designed a new TGIF logo to provide consistency in advertising. TGIF joined the Office of Sustainability in tabling at campus-wide events such as Caltopia and Calapalooza. TGIF also participated in all four Sustainability Forums, the PLAYgreen Festival, Earthweek, and Spring Welcome Week, and coordinated an activity at Cal Day with Cal Do Something. Three of the 2009 grantees and TGIF continued the tradition of creating posters that were displayed at the 2010 CACS Summit. These posters were up for awards at the 2010 This Way to Sustainability Conference VI at CSU Chico.

During 2010, TGIF publicity also extended beyond the Berkeley campus to state and national conferences. TGIF Coordinator Nicole Leung presented at the ACUI Conference with Katie Maynard of UC Santa Barbara and James Robinson of Humboldt State on how to create and run grant fee programs. Nicole also presented at the California Higher Education Sustainability Summit with Judy Chess on how to support sustainability projects on campus. In October, Nicole presented at the 2010 AASHE conference with Mieko Ozeki of the University of Vermont, Cindy Shea of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and Suhail Barot of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on implementing green fee programs following successful referendum campaigns. The success of these conference presentations was due to the growing collaboration amongst the various California and national green fund programs.

The 2009-2010 grants cycle ended with four completed projects, nine projects in progress, and two projects discontinued. TGIF Coordinator Nicole Leung announced her leave from the position to attend graduate school and Katherine Walsh was hired as her replacement on September 7, 2010.


2010-2011: The Fourth Year- TGIF Hires its Second Coordinator
Katherine Walsh was hired as the new TGIF Coordinator and began on September 7th. The 2010-2011 academic year was also the first of two increases in the TGIF fee, from $5.00/student/semester to $5.50/student/semester, as was approved in the 2007 referendum. After completing three years of grant funding, TGIF expanded its publicity and outreach efforts during 2010-2011, such as attending and presenting at various conferences, events, and meetings, launching this new website, a blog, and a Facebook page, hosting grant writing trainings, and publishing various newsletters and articles. TGIF also assisted fellow colleges and universities with the establishment and improvement of their own student-fee based green funds by providing consultation on best practices and lessons learned.

At the 2010 Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Conference, outgoing TGIF Coordinator Nicole Leung served as a panelist in a session entitled Student Green Fee Management and Project Implementation along with Mieko Ozeki, University of Vermont; Suhail Barot, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Amber Garrard, Green Mountain College; Cindy Shea, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and Jedd Wilcox, University of Vermont. At the This Way to Sustainability VI Conference, TGIF Coordinator Katherine Walsh collaborated with Robyn DiFalco (CSU Chico), James Robinson (Humboldt), Chelsea McDaniel (UCSC), and Alisa Orris (UCSC) in a presentation titled Green Funds on Campus: How to Start One on Your Campus and in a panel discussion titled "Green Funds on Campus: Best Practices & Lessons Learned". Six TGIF project posters were also displayed during the conference's poster session. Walsh also presented at the 2011 CACS Sustainability Summit, the 2011 Spring California Student Sustainability Coalition Convergence, and the 2011 California Higher Education Sustainability Conference.

For the 2011 TGIF grants cycle, TGIF held a series of trainings during the abstract, application, and grant winner stages. Throughout January and February, Walsh offered 30-minute trainings entitled "How to Submit a TGIF Abstract" for those interested in applying for a 2011 TGIF grant. During March, Walsh held voluntary trainings for the twenty-four selected final application applicants, entitled "How to submit a TGIF Application." Once the winning applications were announced, Walsh held mandatory trainings for the winning project leaders to review the TGIF funding guidelines and reporting procedures required of the project leaders.

The 2011 Grant Application process received a total of 43 abstract submissions requesting $1,077,124 in awards. The TGIF Committee invited twenty-three abstract applicants to submit final applications and selected fifteen grant winners, awarding a total of $247,675, the largest grant award being $33,100 and the smallest grant being $3,000. Eight projects were student-led and seven projects were staff-led. The grant awards also funded thirty-two new student internships and covered themes such as water efficiency, waste reduction, energy conservation, and habitat restoration.

Twenty-one TGIF projects were completed in 2010-2011, twenty-eight projects continued into 2011-2012, and one project was discontinued at the request of the Coordinator.


2011-2012: The Fifth Year- Reaching Milestones
The 2011-2012 academic year was a dynamic year for The Green Initiative Fund, filled with milestones reached and major program changes. The ASUC Auxiliary, and therefore TGIF, left Business and Administrative Services and joined the Division of Student Affairs under the Dean of Students. As of August 1, 2012, TGIF is a program within the LEAD Center, a unit of the ASUC Auxiliary in the Division of Student Affairs. April 2012 marked the 5th Anniversary of the passing of ASUC Bill 61a TGIF and the establishment of TGIF at UC Berkeley, while Summer Sessions 2012 marked the fifth year of collecting student fees for TGIF grants. To mark its fifth year and meet a goal set in the 2010-2011 Annual Report, the TGIF Committee updated the TGIF bylaws to reflect the changes in the TGIF program that have occurred since its last update in 2009.

2011-2012 also marked the fifth year that the TGIF Committee awarded grant funding, which was celebrated by the awarding of the most funding to the most projects in one grant year. Twenty-two TGIF project presented posters at the 9th Annual CACS Sustainability Summit and the TGIF program was represented at multiple regional and national conferences. TGIF Coordinator Katherine Walsh was selected to serve as the 2012 Staff Co-Chair of the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability and partnered with local non-profit Bay Area Green Tours on its 2011 Grant from the Chancellor's Community Partnership Fund. The TGIF Committee voted in favor of adding an annual fall mini-grant program beginning fall semester 2012, to better serve interested applicants and award greater amounts of funding per year.

The 2011-2012 TGIF Grant Application Process saw an increase in quality and quantity across the board. The TGIF Committee selected 22 projects for grant awards, the most projects awarded in one grant year, and awarded a total of $308,630, the most funding awarded in one grant year, a testament to the strength and innovation of the applications.

This year's amount puts TGIF over the million dollar mark in total grant funding awarded: $1,270,101 in five years of grant awards. TGIF also set program records for most abstracts received and most abstracts invited to submit final applications. TGIF received 25 Early Abstract Submissions and 27 Final Abstract Submissions, with seven abstract resubmissions and four abstracts choosing not to resubmit. This amounted to 45 original abstracts requesting $779,462 in funding. The Committee invited a total of 28 abstracts to submit final applications. A final milestone met by this year's grant awards was greatest number of student internships funded with a total of 56, well up from last year's 32 student internships. This brings TGIF's five year total to 157 paid student green internships.

If a year had a theme, 2012-2013 will be the year of "waste reduction" with the TGIF Committee awarding 8 waste-related projects, in line with UC Berkeley's goal of Zero Waste by 2020. Due to the variety and quality of this year's submissions, the TGIF Committee was able to select at least one project in each sustainability category.


2012-2013: The Sixth Year- Introducing Mini-Grants
The 2012-2013 academic year proved to be another successful year for The Green Initiative Fund. TGIF introduced the TGIF Mini-Grant Program, an opportunity for UC Berkeley students, staff, and faculty to apply for TGIF Grants in the amounts of $500-$2,000 in October and November. TGIF hoped to award up to $20,000 in mini-grants. The goals of the mini-grant program were 1) to fill a gap in fall funding for sustainability projects and 2) to finance projects of smaller scope and shorter timeline.

The mini-grant program proved successful. TGIF received twenty-one mini-grant applications, eleven by the October deadline and ten by the November deadline, requesting a total of $34,000 in funding. TGIF selected twelve projects, awarding a total of $17,525. Five projects were second phases or additional plans for existing TGIF projects, while seven were new projects. As of June 1, 2013, four mini-grant projects were completed, with the remaining eight slated to complete by mid-December 2013. Due to the success of the inaugural mini-grant program, it will now be a permanent grant cycle offered annually by TGIF.

TGIF has speculated that the addition of the fall mini-grant program led to a decrease in spring TGIF Grant Applications. TGIF received twenty-eight original abstract submissions- fourteen early abstract submissions, sixteen final abstract submissions, with two being resubmissions of early abstracts. The applicants requested a total of $589,000 in funding. The application and funding request numbers were down from 2012's numbers of 45 original abstracts and $779,000 requested. TGIF is less interested in the numbers of requests and more concerned with the high quality and originality of project proposals- the 2013 submissions proved to have both.

TGIF awarded a total of $278,505 across fourteen projects, which included the funding of twenty-three paid students internships. For the first time in TGIF history, habitat restoration dominated as the project theme, with five habitat restoration projects selected. The TGIF Coordinator will also be leading grant project "Campus Tree Inventory", another first for TGIF. With the announcement of the 2013 TGIF Spring Grant Awards, TGIF has now awarded over $1.5 million to 96 projects and funded 195 student internships in six years of grant cycles.

In addition to success in grant funding, TGIF grew in the areas of education, outreach, and publicity. TGIF became part of the new LEAD Center and relocated its office to Hearst Gym 102. The transition into the LEAD Center has assisted TGIF with building partnerships and publicity within the Division of Student Affairs, and the physical location within the LEAD Center has led to more connections with new students and student groups. One such group is the new Student Environmental Resource Center, initially funded by a 2012 TGIF Grant. TGIF provided advising and financial support throughout SERC's first year of growth, which included the establishment of a leadership structure and the hosting of multiple successful student-centered events, including the California Student Sustainability Coalition's Spring Convergence.

Twenty-two projects completed in 2012-2013: four mini-grant projects and eighteen spring grant projects.

Air Handling Unit Transmitters Greening the Berkeley Science Review
Berkeley Student Food Collective Food Prep Expansion Greening the Berkeley Science Review: Phase II (MG)
Break the Mode Installation of Bottle Refill Stations
Break the Mode Part II (MG) Lawns to Meadows
Cal Dining Sustainability Team Nature Village: Sustainable Family Living
Cal Habitat Restoration Student Leadership Training Strawberry Creek Planting (Filling the Weed-Shaped Hole)
Composting at Blake Garden (MG) Strawberry Creek Restoration Demonstration
Earth Week 2013 * Strawberry Creek Water Quality Probe (MG)
EcoMovie Nights Student Environmental Resource Center
Food Day 2012 Talking Louder About Sustainability- Next Generation
Green Cup Competition: Round 2 * Teaching, Learning, and Change

*Green Cup Competition: Round 2 and Earth Week 2013 are not considered their own separate projects but phases of the original projects, 2011 funded "Green Cup Competition" and 2008 funded "Earth Week". These two original projects are now considered completed and are factored into the total "completed projects" numbers.


TGIF expanded its influence when it was invited to become a member of the UC Berkeley Zero Waste Working Group and the City of Berkeley Climate Action Coalition. The TGIF Coordinator position was added as an ex-officio position to the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Sustainability and was asked to serve as the 2012-2013 ASUC representation on the UC Berkeley Environmental Management System Committee.

TGIF Coordinator Katherine Walsh presented twice at the 2012 AASHE Conference,Green Funds 1.0: Getting a Fund Started and Green Funds 2.0: The Nitty-Gritty of Campus Sustainability Fund Management from the Ground Up. The Green Funds 2.0 presentation led to Walsh and her co-presenters to co-found the Campus Green Fund Collaborative and begin writing a green fund "how-to" publication in conjunction with AASHE.

Twenty-five TGIF projects presented posters at the 2013 CACS Sustainability Summit and five TGIF projects have been selected to give presentations at the 2013 California Higher Education Sustainability Projects. For the second year in a row, a TGIF/PowerSave Campus Project (Fight the Flow) will be receiving a Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Best Practices Award in the Student Energy Efficiency Category.

TGIF hired TGIF Program Associates in February 2013, marking the first time the TGIF program (not projects) has had student interns. The Program Associates have been assisting the TGIF Coordinator with project documentation, interviewing projects leaders, blogging, and developing new program features, like the TGIF Project Locations Map.

Bylaws of The Green Initiative Fund

The TGIF Bylaws have been updated as of September 2012. You can download a pdf of the latest version here or read the bylaws below.

 BYLAWS OF THE GREEN INITIATIVE FUND

MISSION STATEMENT

The Green Initiative Fund (TGIF) provides funding for projects that reduce UC Berkeley's negative impact on the environment and make UC Berkeley more sustainable. TGIF will allocate funds to projects that promote sustainable modes of transportation, increase energy and water efficiency, restore habitat, promote environmental and food justice, and reduce the amount of waste created by UC Berkeley. Portions of the fund also support education and behavior changes initiatives, student aid (via return to aid), and internships. TGIF is supported by student fees and administered through a student-majority committee and a program coordinator. 

ARTICLE 1 – GRANT MAKING COMMITTEE

SECTION 1.1 – POWERS AND VOTING

The TGIF Committee has authority over TGIF. A simple majority of the Committee’s full membership is required to make funding and any other official decisions, except as provided for elsewhere in these bylaws. Apart from his/her normal function as a part of this committee, a member has no individual authority.

SECTION 1.2 – DUTIES OF GRANT MAKING COMMITTEE

The TGIF Committee is the decision-making body for The Green Initiative Fund. The committee chooses which projects receive funding, approves changes to grant awards, and guides the general direction of TGIF. The TGIF Committee also employs, discharges, supervises, and prescribes the duties of all staff and interns of The Green Initiative Fund.

It shall be the duty of the voting Committee members to:

  • Attend committee meetings
  • Review grant applications and determine the allocation of funds.
  • Vote on issues which require committee approval, such as project adjustments
  • Provide feedback to and help support all grantees


It shall be the duty of the non-voting Committee members to:

  • Attend committee meetings
  • Provide advice and background information to the committee during grant review
  • Provide feedback to the committee on issues which require committee approval, such as project adjustments
  • Provide feedback to and help support all grantees 


SECTION 1.3 – MEMBER NUMBER & REPRESENTATION


The TGIF Committee shall consist of four students and three non-students, as follows:

Voting Members

  • One graduate Student appointed by the Chair of the Environmental Sustainability Committee of the Graduate Assembly (GA)
  • One undergraduate Student appointed by the Associated Students of the University of California (ASUC) Environmental Sustainability Director
  • One Student appointed by the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Sustainability (CACS)
  • One undergraduate Student, selected by the TGIF Committee after the other three student members have been selected. This position is open to all undergraduate Students via a Student-at-Large application.
  • One Faculty member selected by the Academic Senate
  • One Staff member from Administration, selected by the Vice Chancellor for Administration
  • One Staff member from Facilities Services, selected by the Vice Chancellor of Facilities Services


Non-Voting Members
The campus Director of Sustainability, the Assistant Director of Green Buildings, a member of the Committee on Student Fees, a representative of the ASUC Senate, shall attend Committee meetings as non-voting Members, and the Committee shall invite experts/guests to provide information and expertise as needed.

SECTION 1.4 – OFFICERS

The TGIF Committee shall have two officers, a Chair and a Vice Chair. The Chair shall preside at all meetings of the TGIF Committee, acting as facilitator and holding meetings to the agenda in a timely fashion. The Chair shall also coordinate and approve meeting agendas with the TGIF Coordinator (described in Article 2). The Chair must be a Student member of the TGIF Committee.

The Vice Chair will assist the Chair with his or her duties. In the absence of the Chair, the Vice Chair shall assume all duties of the Chair. The Vice Chair may be a Student, Faculty, or Staff member of the TGIF Committee.

At the beginning of each term of office, the TGIF Committee will take nominations and volunteers for Chair and Vice Chair. Candidates for Chair will be selected first, by majority vote of the Committee. After the Chair has been selected, the Committee shall select the Vice Chair by majority vote. Defeated candidates for Chair are eligible to run for Vice Chair, and candidates for both positions are eligible to vote in these elections.

The Chair and Vice Chair shall hold office for one year; though with committee approval a Chair or Vice Chair can serve another term.

SECTION 1.5 – TERMS OF OFFICE

Each member of the TGIF Committee shall be appointed for one year. The Graduating seniors may choose to end their term in May at the close of the spring semester. The TGIF Committee must meet at the beginning of the fall semester to select the Student-at-Large Representative from a pool of applicants. Committee members may serve no more than two consecutive terms but the total number of terms they may serve is not limited. The TGIF Coordinator will contact the appointing representative bodies for Committee member nominations in August.

SECTION 1.6 – MEMBER QUALIFICATIONS

All Student members of the TGIF Committee must be registered (full or part-time) UC Berkeley students during their term of office. The Student-at-Large applicants may only be undergraduate students. Students graduating at the end of the spring semester or a subsequent summer session are still eligible for committee membership, even though their student status may technically expire before the end of summer. Staff members of the TGIF Committee must be currently employed by UC Berkeley; faculty may be currently employed or emeritus.

SECTION 1.7 – MEMBER REPLACEMENT


A Committee member may be removed by unanimous vote of the other Committee members for unjustifiable absence, conflict of interest, or other appropriate reasons. In the event that a Committee member is removed or resigns, the original appointing body will select a replacement. The new Committee member will serve the remainder of the original member’s term.

SECTION 1.8 – CONFLICT OF INTEREST

The TGIF Committee shall conduct itself in such a way that conflicts of interest are minimized and all potential conflicts of interest are made public.

For example, each Committee member must make public all campus groups and organizations of which he or she is a member. Where appropriate, the Committee member should recuse himself or herself from voting on grant allocations for projects proposed by such groups. For such votes, the “full Committee membership” as defined for voting majority purposes shall be decreased to account for the Committee member's recusal. 

ARTICLE 2 – TGIF COORDINATOR

SECTION 2.1 – DUTIES OF THE TGIF COORDINATOR

There will be one staff position 80% FTE [Full-Time Employee] referred to as the TGIF Coordinator. The TGIF Coordinator works under the direction of the TGIF Committee and exists to meet the needs of the Committee. The TGIF Coordinator reports to the Executive Director of the ASUC Auxiliary and the Director of the LEAD Center.

The function of the TGIF Coordinator is to:

TGIF Committee

  • Advise and support the TGIF Committee
  • Recruit and orient new Committee members annually
  • Facilitate communication between project grantees and the TGIF Committee


Project Management

  • Develop and run trainings and workshops for grant applicants and grant recipients
  • Advise prospective grant applicants
  • Advise TGIF funded projects and track their progress, ensuring all projects are meeting TGIF grant and program policies


Communications

  • Coordinate with and support larger campus-wide sustainability initiatives
  • Coordinate TGIF-related speaking opportunities at on- and off-campus events
  • Develop and maintain all forms of TGIF communications and publicity
  • Provide sustainability fund consultation for fellow higher education institutions
  • Serve as an ex-officio on the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Sustainability


Budget & Administration

  • Manage the TGIF budget and other administrative tasks
  • Document all TGIF-related activity and author the TGIF annual report; maintain and update the TGIF archives


SECTION 2.2 – HIRING THE GRANT COORDINATOR


The TGIF Coordinator will be hired via open recruitment. Candidates must understand and agree to comply with all of TGIF’s Bylaws and supporting documents. The TGIF Committee must approve the selected Coordinator candidate and participate in regular performance evaluations. The Committee may recommend that the Executive Director of the ASUC Auxiliary dismiss the Coordinator in response to poor performance. Only the Executive Director of the ASUC Auxiliary has the authority to dismiss the TGIF Coordinator.

SECTION 2.3 – SALARY OF THE GRANT COORDINATOR

Funds for the TGIF Coordinator’s compensation (salary and benefits) are allocated annually from the TGIF budget before the amount available to be allocated for projects is calculated. The amount of the TGIF Coordinator’s compensation will be commensurate with the level appropriate to the responsibilities of the position.

SECTION 2.4 – OPERATIONAL BUDGET FOR THE GRANT COORDINATOR

The TGIF Coordinator may submit an annual budget request to the TGIF Committee for funds to be used for operational expenses incurred by the Coordinator in the performance if his or her duties. 

ARTICLE 3 – ALLOCATION OF FUNDS & PROJECT SELECTION

SECTION 3.1 – ALLOCATION OF FUNDS BY THE GRANT MAKING COMMITTEE

As noted in Section 1.1, the TGIF Committee shall decide the allocate funds to submitted projects by a simple majority vote of the full Committee membership. The Committee may elect to fund only a portion of a proposal.

The TGIF Committee shall award a total of $20,000 each fall in the form of $500-2,000 Mini-Grants. Applicants will be given two opportunities to apply, unless all $20,000 is awarded by the first application deadline. Mini-Grant recipients will be announced within three weeks past the deadline.

The TGIF Committee shall award additional grants of $2,000 or greater each spring. The TGIF Committee and Coordinator will determine the total amount each spring, based on the amount of student fees received for that year. Applicants will first submit an abstract in January or February and selected applicants will be invited by the TGIF Committee to submit Final Applications in April. Grant Recipients will be announced in May.

SECTION 3.2 – SET-ASIDE FOR PROJECTS WITH STRONG STUDENT COMPONENT

At least 20% of the funds dispersed by the TGIF Committee for projects each year shall be allocated to projects with direct student involvement. Such projects include, but are not limited to: internships, initiatives which include students in their oversight bodies, student research-related expenses, and projects proposed by students.

SECTION 3.3 – GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PROPOSED PROJECTS


All projects to be considered for TGIF funding must meet the following criteria:

  • Projects must directly address environmental sustainability on UC Berkeley’s campus, or in the capacity that on-campus activities are creating negative environmental impacts in neighboring communities. All proposed projects must have a clearly defined, measurable outcome.
  • Project proposals may be submitted by UC Berkeley students, staff, and faculty. Individuals and organizations outside of UC Berkeley may not submit proposals.
  • Projects shall have received all necessary written approval by appropriate campus officials prior to consideration.
  • TGIF funding will not support projects already mandated by law or UC Berkeley policy directive (e.g., standards for new building construction), since UC Berkeley is already obliged to allocate funds for such projects. TGIF will fund projects which go above and beyond minimum requirements and that are unable to gain funding from other sources.
  • All projects shall have a mechanism for evaluation and follow-up after funding has been dispersed. All funded projects must submit the required project updates, posters, and final reports. If a project is expected to have ongoing benefits such as annual cost savings, the project plan must include a mechanism for tracking, recording, and reporting these benefits back to the TGIF Committee on an (at least) annual basis.
  • Projects must have publicity, education, and outreach components.
  • Projects are encouraged to have student involvement.


SECTION 3.4 – PROJECT PROPOSALS WHICH MUST BE REQUESTED AS LOANS


Many projects may result in cost savings or revenues to the person or group submitting the project proposal to the TGIF Committee. Where reasonable and at its discretion, the Committee may require that all or part of the project funding be dispersed as a loan (instead of a grant) to be repaid to TGIF over a reasonable time period. This time period will be negotiated by the TGIF Committee and the person or group proposing the project, before funds are awarded. In exceptional cases, the Committee also has the authority to negotiate that a portion of all subsequent revenues (after the loan has been repaid) shall go into the TGIF.

Portions of such funding awards used to pay student interns do not need to be repaid to TGIF.

SECTION 3.5 – PREFERENCES FOR PROPOSED PROJECTS

The TGIF Committee shall give preference and priority to project proposals that also meet the following criteria in this section. However, meeting these criteria is not required for projects to be considered for TGIF funding.

  • Preference will be given to projects that demonstrate the greatest reduction in UC Berkeley’s negative environmental impacts for the least cost.
  • Preference will be given to projects that are able to repay the Fund, even if such repayment would not be required by Section 3.4 above.
  • Preference will be given to projects with a strong student-participation component.
  • Preference will be given to projects that can obtain matching funds from sources other than TGIF.
  • Preference will be given to projects impacting UC Berkeley’s sustainability “closer to home.” For example, priority will be given to projects that directly address sustainability on campus over projects which address the Bay Area-wide environmental impacts of UC Berkeley’s campus operations.


SECTION 3.5 – ADDITIONAL PROJECT CRITERIA AT DISCRETION OF COMMITTEE


The TGIF Committee may determine additional requirements or preferences for each year’s funding cycle, provided that these additional criteria are:

  • Consistent with the overall mission of TGIF.
  • Consistent with the requirements and preferences outlined in these Bylaws.

ARTICLE 4 – OTHER RULES GOVERNING TGIF FUNDS
  • Any funds not allocated in a given year shall remain in the TGIF account for future use.
  • Funds allocated to a project that are not spent within the project timeframe shall be returned to TGIF for reallocation, unless the project has submitted and received Committee approval for a timeline adjustment.
  • Standing funds must be invested in a socially responsible manner.
  • TGIF funds are not to be used or reallocated for purposes other than those described in this document.
  • TGIF shall continue to operate even after student fees are no longer collected into the Fund, as long as sufficient money remains in the TGIF account.

ARTICLE 5 – ACCOUNTABILITY, RECORDS AND REPORTS

SECTION 5.1 – TGIF’S ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE STUDENT BODY

TGIF shall be accountable to the student body and therefore shall:

  • Make all its records available to the public via the TGIF website and annual report to the Student Fee Referendum Committee.
  • Issue a TGIF Annual Report of its activities to the ASUC Senate, the Graduate Assembly, the Executive Director of the ASUC Auxiliary, the Committee member appointing bodies, and the public.



SECTION 5.2 – ACCOUNTABILITY OF PROJECTS

  • All projects funded by TGIF shall submit project updates to the TGIF Coordinator and a project poster during the project’s progress. All projects will also submit a final report upon completion of the project. The final report must include a budget detailing the spending of all funds and answer the questions stated in the “Final Report Guidelines”.
  • Upon review of the Final Report, the TGIF Coordinator shall judge whether the funds were spent within the scope of the project. If the Coordinator feels the funds were spent outside of the project scope, the Coordinator may recommend that the TGIF Committee require the return some or the entire grant funds to TGIF.
  • Projects who consistently fail to submit the required documentation by the set deadlines will not be eligible to apply for and receive future funds from TGIF. The TGIF Committee also may require such projects to complete additional reporting processes.


SECTION 5.3 – RECORDS AND REPORTS


TGIF must keep on record:

  • Minutes of all meetings of the TGIF Committee indicating the time and place of holding such meetings, the names of those present, and the proceedings thereof.
  • Adequate and correct books and records of account, including accounts of its properties and business transactions and accounts of its assets, receipts, disbursements, gains and losses.
  • All abstract submissions and grant applications received each year.
  • Records of projects selected each year and the funds allocated to each.
  • Updates, posters, and reports submitted by TGIF funded projects and all annual reports received from projects with ongoing benefits.
  • Copies of all annual reports which TGIF has issued to the ASUC Senate, the Graduate Assembly, the Executive Director of the ASUC Auxiliary, the Committee member appointing bodies, and the Student Fee Referendum Committee.


ARTICLE 6 – AMENDMENT OF BYLAWS

A two-thirds (2/3) vote by the voting members of the existing TGIF Committee may amend, create, or repeal portions of these Bylaws, unless doing so would materially and adversely affect the mission of TGIF.

TGIF Bylaws Version 21
Updated September 2012

Mission Statement

The Green Initiative Fund (TGIF) provides funding for projects that reduce UC Berkeley's negative impact on the environment and make UC Berkeley more sustainable. TGIF will allocate funds to projects that promote sustainable modes of transportation, increase energy and water efficiency, restore habitat, promote environmental and food justice, and reduce the amount of waste created by UC Berkeley. Portions of the fund also support education and behavior change initiatives, student aid (via return to aid), and internships. TGIF is supported by student fees and administered through a student-majority committee and a program coordinator.